2007 Awardee: Selina Law

I have already started research work, and am excited at the possibilities this award will give me. Thanks again.

Biography

Originally from Northern Ireland, Selina moved to Scotland to study textile design. She gained a first-class honours degree specialising in woven textiles and continues to live and work in Dundee, where she is currently designer in residence at Duncan of Jordanstone College.

In 2005 Selina won the Society of Dyers and Colourists’ Colour in Textile award and in the following year was selected as one of six weave designers by the Texprint group as a ‘star designer of the future’. Other awards which Selina has won include the Veronica Bell Award for Colour in Textiles, which included in the prize the opportunity for her designs to be incorporated into textiles used for menswear, and the F&A Bradshaw Award for a research trip to Japan.

Selina has showcased her work at First View, Chelsea, Indigo and in Premier Vision in Paris. Her clients include Calvin Klein. Her textiles are considered to be ‘exquisite, beautifully designed and perfectly executed’.

Selina is currently working to create a new fashion accessory collection.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Award will help to fund the creation of Selina’s accessory collection.

Since the Award

Selina writes that the knitted collection she produced is ‘a capsule collection based on the theme of perspective….the pieces I have produced are almost what one would call knitted jewellery, in both function and theme’. Selina went on to teach textiles to students of all abilities, some with special educational needs. Alongside her teaching she continues to design and develop new collections and research into sustainable fashion and textiles.

I have already started research work, and am excited at the possibilities this award will give me. Thanks again.

2006 Awardee: Jamie Tetsill

I was so thrilled and honoured to receive an award

Biography

Brought up in Falkirk, Jamie Tetsill graduated from Glasgow School of Art in 2005 with a first-class honours degree in textile design. After graduation, Jamie was one of 24 young hopeful fashion designers to be invited to showcase his work at international fashion exhibitions in London and Paris.

This confirmed his ambition to embark on a career in fashion. James successfully competed for a place on the prestigious and intense masters in fashion at Central St. Martins, London, which has launched the careers of many of Britain’s brightest and hottest fashion designers.

As an undergraduate, Jamie impressed with his outstanding creativity and ability to challenge orthodox approaches with flair and panache. Twenty-four year old Jamie is working towards his fashion collection to complete his Masters. It promises to combine both creativity and experimentation to produce an interesting and dynamic collection.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Awards helped fund the costs of making and producing Jamie’s final collection.

Since the Award

While still at Central St Martins, Jamie was invited to meet legendary designer Donna Karen and talk her through his folio of designs. He was one of only 20 MA students to be invited to show his degree collection during London Fashion Week. This resulted in lots of media attention after which Jamie was nominated for one of the Scottish Fashion Award’s New Talent Awards.

As part of the Glasgow Fashion Collective, Jamie showed his second collection the following year at London Fashion Week. He is now developing his own label.

I was so thrilled and honoured to receive an award

2006 Awardee: Lee Borwick

I am overjoyed at the news of my award from the Dewar Art Awards, so generous and kind.

Biography

Originally from Galashiels, Lee Borthwick graduated with a first-class honours from Gray’s School of Art in Aberdeen. She received the John Grays Legacy while an undergraduate and was also nominated by Gray’s for the BP Prize.

While an undergraduate Lee took part in an exchange scheme and spent some time in Finland, which had a significant influence on her creative work. She was intrigued by the empty landscapes, wild nature, icy colours and abandoned wooden houses and developed a range of fabrics exploring the surface of wood and markings created by nature.

Lee, like many people of her generation, is concerned about the environment and interested in using eco-friendly, sustainable textiles.

After graduating, Lee won a place on the highly competitive Masters course in Constructed Textiles at the Royal College of Art in London. Lee’s outstanding talent and intellect approach to textile design will no doubt take her far both nationally and internationally.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Award provides crucial financial support to Lee while studying at the RCA, London.

Lee’s funding has been continued for a further year into 2007. She writes, “I always aimed to keep my personal voice amongst so many testing projects. Through this … I was nominated to be one of the exhibitors as part of the ‘Out of the Blue’ exhibition this summer. I was selected as one of 23 students out of 90 who applied.”

Since the Award

Lee graduated with an MA in Constructed Textiles after a year which she describes as being ‘the most exciting, challenging and inspiring year of my life so far.’ Sustainability and the environment are key issues in Lee’s practice.  A collaborative project with a fellow student in Printed Textiles was shortlisted by Valpak, the leading provider of recycling solutions for the UK.

During her final year, Lee was awarded the John Dunsmore Scholarship, giving her the opportunity to visit Nepal to work with a community of weavers. She plans to help them develop products such as bags and clothing for the local market. Her final degree collection of work was shown in the Modern and Contemporary Art and Design Auction, arranged by auctioneers Lyon and Turnbull.

I am overjoyed at the news of my award from the Dewar Art Awards, so generous and kind.

2006 Awardee: Malcolm Cruickshank

It has been really lovely that ‘unknown’ people in the field of the arts have recognised my worth and been prepared to put their faith in my abilities

Biography

Malcolm Cruickshank is a graduate of Cumbria Institute of the Arts and his ambition is to develop a successful career in the applied arts.

Born and brought up in Edinburgh, Malcolm is an innovative designer and maker. He excels at combining the unusual and unconventional to create well designed objects that function.

These objects have ranged from ‘wearable art’ to lighting and seating and incorporate embroidery, weave, felt, rubber and ‘found materials’. He is particularly ingenious at seeing the potential in recycled materials.
Since a young boy, Malcolm has been fascinated by the whole process of craft making and impressed craft workers whom he spent time observing with his passion and raw creativity.

One of the solo exhibitions which Malcolm was offered in 2006, titled ‘Haute Kilture’ to present a range of alternative kilts and accessories, was supported by an Award.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Awards contributed towards the costs of Malcolm’s 2006 Jedburgh exhibition ‘Haute Kilture’.

Before the exhibition opened, Malcolm was offered a six-month appointment by Midlothian as a schools’ Artist in Residence. He writes, “I have no doubt that [this award] must have been at least a contributing factor to their final decision.”

Since the Award

After the exhibition, Malcolm was approached by a London gallery who wished to mount his exhibition during London Fashion Week in March 2007. In March 2008 he received the Morton Fraser Award from Visual Arts Scotland.

It has been really lovely that ‘unknown’ people in the field of the arts have recognised my worth and been prepared to put their faith in my abilities

2006 Awardee: Sarah Hutchison

Biography

The professor of silversmithing at the Edinburgh College of Art ranks Sarah as “one of the two remarkable fine metalworkers I have encountered during my teaching career.” The other being Andrew Lamb, Dewar Arts Award winner in 2003.

The most remarkable aspect of Sarah’s work is that within a very ancient craft she has found an innovative way of making silversmithing pieces. By breaking historic ‘rules’ she is developing an entirely fresh way of working.
Sarah is also very unusual in that she works comfortably and skillfully in both silversmithing and jewellery. Sarah injects an entirely feminine and decorative aesthetic to functional objects by including stones and pearls within silversmithing pieces.

Already winner of several prestigious awards, including 2004 Student Designer of the Year, Sarah is “an ambitious spirit” who consistently produces exciting, fresh and radical work.

Originally from Port Seton near Edinburgh, Sarah is ready to take her place on the international arena.

The Dewar Arts Award will enable Sarah to design and produce three large-scale objects in silver and gold and support a study visit to Mexico to develop her ideas.

Since the Award

Sarah successfully completed a magnificant candelabra, a pair of water jugs and a milk and sugar set to go with a teapot (see images in her gallery) during her year supported by an Award.  She would not have made the teaset on speculation, yet it beautifully showcases her incredible talent as a silversmith.

Sarah writes, “My Dewar Award came at a great time for me in my career.  I was feeling confident and inspired to make bigger pieces.  I would never have been able to finance myself and I really have learnt a great deal over the past year.”

2005 Awardee: Anthony Campbell

The difference that this award will make in helping me reach my dream is immeasurable

Biography

Anthony gained a first class degree in design textiles at the Glasgow School of Art and went on to pursue an MA in Fashion at Central St Martin’s, London, one of the UK’s major fashion colleges.

He writes: “my work is concerned with researching and developing textile design in the realm of menswear. I intend to do this by designing and developing textiles using digital print and knit technologies, challenging the use of these techniques and applying them to menswear design.”

Anthony’s aim is to launch himself as a contemporary menswear designer, through his final degree show at London Fashion Week.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Award helped towards his MA in fashion at Central St Martin’s, London.

The difference that this award will make in helping me reach my dream is immeasurable

2005 Awardee: Jennifer McHardy

Thank you very much for giving me the chance to begin to fulfil my dreams and ambitions within this creative and competitive industry.

Biography

Jennifer gained a first-class honours degree in textile and surface design from Gray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University before winning a place on the highly competitive MA in Constructed Textiles at the Royal College of Art, London.

From the start of her studies, Jennifer’s talent and innovation stood out, culminating in a ‘stunning’ final degree show. Her work reveals exceptional talent shot through with wit and intellectual rigour.

Whether Jennifer’s design takes her into theatrical design or a more commercial career as a textile designer, it is certain that she will be successful.

How the Award Helped

Jennifer received a Dewar Arts Award towards her MA studies at the Royal College of Art, London.

Since the Award

Jennifer’s degree collection, see below, was based upon traditional Scottish knitted textiles given a contemporary twist with the use of unusual materials and processes. Jennifer won a Rowan Yarns design competition with her design appearing in the Rowan Studio catalogue.
Jennifer’s work features in our 10th Anniversary Exhibition.

Thank you very much for giving me the chance to begin to fulfil my dreams and ambitions within this creative and competitive industry.

2003 Awardee: Andrew Lamb

The experiences I have had meant that having graduated I was in a great position and gave me the confidence to set up on my own

Biography

As an undergraduate at the Edinburgh College of Art, Andrew Lamb, was considered to be one of the finest young metalworkers/jewellers of his generation.  By the time he went on to do a Masters at London’s Royal College of Art, Andrew had won several prestigious UK and international awards for his work, including the World Crafts Council Europe Award for Contemporary Crafts in Munich.

Andrew writes that the award came at just the right time for him creatively.  He had been spending a lot of time mastering new techniques, but was cautious about the cost of the materials he was using.

Receiving the award meant that “I could take the plunge and put to the test my discoveries using white, yellow and red gold, and silver. The results meant I could successfully go on to produce an exciting final body of work which would subsequently lead me to the next level in my career.”

Andrew went on to win a number of major prizes for his final year show. He was also given the very prestigious commission by De Beers to design a piece to be presented by the Queen to John Oxx, trainer of Azamour, the winning horse in the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes.

How the Award Helped

The Dewar Arts Award supported Andrew in the second year of his Master’s degree.

Since the Award

Andrew writes that he is “so pleased and extremely grateful to have been given such a prestigious Award. It goes without saying that the Dewar Arts Award has been massively beneficial and supportive to me at that particular stage in my career.” For more information about Andrew’s work, see www.andrewlamb.co.uk.

The experiences I have had meant that having graduated I was in a great position and gave me the confidence to set up on my own